A Chronology of Japanese History

Mythology
Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto produce the islands of Japan.
Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto produce the Sun Goddess, Amaterasu no kami.
Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto produce the Moon God, Tsuki-yumi no Mikoto.
Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto produce Susa no O no Mikoto. He lives on the islands while Amaterasu and Tsuki-yumi live in heaven.
Amaterasu and Susa no O produce five male deities and three female dieties by crunching up various jewels and other personal possessions and blowing on them. Amaterasu declares, "As for the seed of the five male Deities born last, their birth was from things of mine; so undoubtedly they are my children. As for the seed of the three female Deities born first, their birth was from a thing of thine; so doubtless they are thy children."
The daughter of Takamimusubi is married to the son of Amaterasu. A son is born and he is named Ninigi no Mikoto.
Amaterasu, on the order of Takamimusubi, sends Ninigi no Mikoto, to Mt. Hiuga in what is now called Kysh to rule over Japan. She gives him the curved Yasaka jewel, the eight-hand Yata mirror, and the sword of Kusanagi. In addition, as attendants she sent Ame no Koyane no Mikoto (the first ancester of the Nakatomi), Futodama no Mikoto (the first ancestor of the Imbe), Ame no Uzume no Mikoto (the first ancestor of the Sarume), Ishikoridome no Mikoto (the first ancestor of the mirror makers), and Tamaya no Mikoto (the first ancestor of the jewel makers).
Ningi no Mikoto marries Toyo-tama-hime, the daughter of God of the Sea. She dies while delivering their child Hiko hoho demi no Mikoto.
Ninigi no Mikoto's great-grandson, Jimmu, is enthroned and his title is changed from Mikoto to Tenn. At the age of forty-five, he undertakes a campaign to move to the east and settles in Yamato after defeating the local tribes.
From this point, the rest is history.
Yamato Period (300-550) & Asuka Period (550-710)
Nara Period (710-794)
Heian Period (794-1185)
Kamakura Period (1185-1333)
Muromachi Period (1338-1573)
Azuchi-Momoyama Period (1568-1600)
Edo Period (1603-1868)
Meiji Period (1868-1912)
Taishō Period (1912-1926)
Shōwa Period (1926-1989)
Heisei Period (1989-Present)


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